The Monday after May 22nd.

Written by Jack van Ommen on May 24th, 2011
Alpes d’Huez Cancer Challenge:
I have had some very nice responses. But, come on, the rest of you. My e-mailwent  to over 200 people. I figure that my blog efforts are worth at least the equivalent of one movie ticket or a good bottle of wine. That way you’d help cancer research and show your affirmation of this travel log for a whopping $2000. Let’s show the Dutch Watermen what we can add from America and beyond. Beside making a deposit into my Bank of
America account you can also pay to Pay Pal:
Jacob D. van Ommen, 4516 Greendell Rd, Chesapeake, Va 23321.
I will acknowledge each deposit and Marinus Hoogendoorn will also add his response.
I am beat. Right now I am having a cold Golden Brau brewsky in the second option for a possible wireless connection. No luck here either. I worked till 5 p.m. Because of the heat I have a routine to work on the shady side of the boat. Morning starboard, afternoon port side.
Whenever I sand down to bare wood I need to get epoxy on it before the late afternoon thunderstorms.  I leave work on the bottom and engine for a rainy day.  The six months behind the laptop and eating too much at the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays are an extra challenge but I am slowly getting back in shape again.
There will be photos of the new hull color and my gorgeous teen age body, I promise…..well, I tell that to myself to keep going when I am ready to
quit and buy a bus ticket to Turkey.
I had a break. Toma, the boatbuilder here, told me that there is no charge for extracting the shaft bearing. This was at least a 16 man hour job, making up the extraction tool and getting the bearing out of the shaft log. Probably, this is a complimentary job, for the fact that they never moved the boat inside the hangar, as was promised. Toma is also machining my folding prop which has become very sloppy in the 30 years of it’s life time.
Zimnicea remained without internet since Sunday evening. It is Tueday morning and I am in Alexandria, the nearest bigger city. Camelia and Alex, the physical education teacher at her school, drove me here. They have some school business and shopping to do before they leave tonight for Bucarest to catch their flight on early Wednesday morning to Sweden. We will stop at a Gypsy village on the way back to Zimnicea. This is a real colorful affaire, I have been promised, be sure to catch the pictures on the next blog.
The below pictures show the Cottonwood seed fluff from the plantations along the Danube.
 

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